Saturn atmospheric simulations using DYNAMICO

This dataset contains model output from the Saturn DYNAMICO simulations described in Cabanes et al. (2020).

We use a high performance Global Climate Model, DYNAMICO, to model the atmospheric circulation of gas giants with appropriate physical parametrizations for Saturn's atmosphere. The model solves the 3D primitive equations of motion. We ran a simulation covering 15 Saturn years. Wind fields are output every 20 Saturn days at 32 pressure levels onto a 0.5-degree latitude-longitude grid.

The dataset is available HERE, and is licensed under CC BY 4.0 International.

A more complete description of the dataset can be found in the dataset Readme PDF.

Citation: S. Cabanes, A. Spiga, & R. M. B. Young (2020) "JUMP - Data collection - Part I: Jets from a Global Climate Model [data set]", Zenodo. doi:10.5281/zenodo.3638105.

Simulations of Jupiter's weather layer

This dataset contains model output from the simulations used in Jupiter GCM papers Part I and Part II. It contains instantaneous model states from two simulations, generated by a version of the MIT General Circulation Model modified to simulate Jupiter’s upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The MITgcm is available from http://mitgcm.org. A complete description of the Jupiter model is in Part I, except for the cloud scheme, which is in Part II.

The data are instantaneous snapshots of the flow fields from two simulations, covering a period of 100 d with snapshots every 20 d. Run A has no heat flux into the bottom of the domain, and Run B has 5.7 W m−2 heat flux into the bottom of the domain. The fields included are zonal velocity, meridional velocity, vertical velocity in pressure coordinates, potential temperature, and mass mixing ratios for ammonia (gas, solid), hydrogen sulphide (gas), ammonium hydrosulphide (solid), and water (gas, liquid, solid).

The dataset is available HERE, and is licensed under ODC-By v1.0.

A more complete description of the dataset can be found in the dataset Readme PDF.

Citation: R.M.B. Young, P.L. Read, & Y. Wang (2018) "Simulating Jupiter’s weather layer: Accompanying data for Parts I and II", Oxford University Research Archive. doi:10.5287/bodleian:PyYbbxpk2.

Jupiter horizontal wind velocities at cloud level from Cassini

This dataset contains horizontal wind velocity vectors at the top of Jupiter’s main cloud deck, covering four rotation periods during December 2000. These wind measurements are based on a series of visible camera images taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. They were analysed using a cloud tracking procedure based on a Correlation Imaging Velocimetry method developed to analyse fluid dynamics experiments. The dataset contains 1123505 horizontal wind velocity vectors covering 360 degrees in longitude and +/-50 degrees in planetocentric latitude. The dataset also includes a Python script to convert the velocity vectors from spherical geometry to oblate spheroidal geometry, and to estimate observational uncertainties.

This dataset was the basis for the structure function analysis and some of the spectral flux analysis in my paper on kinetic energy cascades in Jupiter's atmosphere. We used a slightly different version of this dataset in Galperin et al. (2014) and that dataset is available as supplementary material to that paper.

The dataset is available HERE, and is licensed under ODC-By v1.0.

A more complete description of the dataset can be found on the Oxford GPFD group webpage HERE, and in the dataset Readme PDF.

Citation: R.M.B. Young, P.L. Read, D. Armstrong, & A.J. Lancaster (2017) "Jupiter horizontal wind velocities at cloud level from Cassini", Oxford University Research Archive. doi:10.5287/bodleian:D5oVPJVRv.

The thermally-driven rotating annulus: horizontal velocities in regular and weakly chaotic flow regimes

This dataset contains 11 1/2 hours of horizontal velocity measurements from four experiments using AOPP's "small annulus" thermally-driven rotating annulus laboratory experiment. The experiments cover regular (2S, 3AV, two experiments) and weakly chaotic (3SV, two experiments) flow regimes. The apparatus consists of two concentric right circular cylinders with height 14.0cm and radii 2.5cm and 8.0cm, with a 17% glycerol / 83% water mixture (by volume) between them. The outer cylinder is heated and the inner cylinder cooled relative to the working fluid, with a temperature difference of approximately 4K, and the apparatus rotates about the co-incident axis of the two cylinders at rates between 0.75 and 3.1 rad/s. This setup mimics the main effects acting on a planetary atmosphere: gravity, rotation, and a heating gradient between low and high latitudes.

The experiments were originally run in 1998. This dataset was put together after using the measurements during my DPhil work on assimilation and predictability in the rotating annulus.

The dataset is available HERE, and is licensed under ODC-By v1.0.

A more complete description of the dataset can be found on the Oxford GPFD group webpage HERE, and in the dataset Readme PDF.

Citation: R.M.B. Young, P.L. Read, W-G. Früh, D. Smith, & S.H. Risch (2015) "The thermally-driven rotating annulus: horizontal velocities in regular and weakly chaotic flow regimes", Oxford University Research Archive. doi:10.5287/bodleian:dr26xx49n.

Waves, Turbulence and Diffusion in Beta-Plumes

This dataset contains horizontal velocity measurements from the 5m diameter rotating tank experiment at TurLab, University of Turin. The experiments were set up to form beta-plumes in a rapidly rotating fluid on a conical topographic beta-plane. Horizontal velocities were measured using the UVMAT/CIV software.

The dataset is available HERE.

Citation: P.L. Read, B. Galperin, S. Espa, R.M.B. Young, & H. Scolan (2018) "Waves, Turbulence and Diffusion in Beta-Plumes", hosted at TurBase.